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Proving Myself: Stories about fighting distrust


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Proving Myself: Stories about fighting distrust
Pub date: 2019-09-06

This week we present two stories from people who have to prove themselves in science acedemia.

Part 1: When there’s an explosion in the chemistry lab, graduate student Chanté Summers springs into action.

Part 2: When Adriana Briscoe’s professor accuses her of cheating, she scrambles to save her reputation and her spot on the biology lab’s field trip.

Chanté Summers is a research chemist at Pfizer Inc where she supports the development of conjugate vaccines. Chanté first became interested in science during high school. Pursuing that dream, she completed a MS in Chemistry from SIUe where her thesis focused on the synthesis of potential biologically active compounds. Outside of the lab, Chanté is proud to engage the community through volunteer work, promote diversity within the sciences, and inspiring local youth to explore STEM fields. With all that extra time, Chanté enjoys traveling, being outdoors, and unwinding with her dog.

Adriana Darielle Mejía Briscoe is an evolutionary biologist and lepidopterist. Her research has been featured in The Los Angeles Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, U.S. News and World Report, National Geographic, Scientific American, and on public radio. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the California Academy of Sciences, and was recently honored with the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, the first woman and third person overall to have been given all three of these awards. She is working on her first book, a memoir about butterflies.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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91: Shifting the goalposts in statistics (with Kristin Sainani)


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 91: Shifting the goalposts in statistics (with Kristin Sainani)
Pub date: 2019-09-02

We chat with Kristin Sainani (Stanford University) about a popular statistical method in sports medicine research (magnitude based inference), which has been banned by some journals, but continues to thrive in some pockets of scholarship. We also discuss the role of statistical inference in the current replication crisis.

Links and info

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Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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Episode citation and permanent link
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2019, September 2) “Shifting the goalposts in statistics (with Kristin Sainani)”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], Retrieved from https://osf.io/3q25f/

Special Guest: Kristin Sainani.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Ep. 70: Why Trust Science? with Author Naomi Oreskes


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Podcast: Got Science?
Episode: Ep. 70: Why Trust Science? with Author Naomi Oreskes
Pub date: 2019-10-22


Science Historian Naomi Oreskes explains why science’s social character makes it trustworthy, and what we can learn from science’s past.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Union of Concerned Scientists, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Aquatic Ecologist And The Biological Engineer


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Aquatic Ecologist And The Biological Engineer
Pub date: 2019-10-20


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking about risk and, as we like to do, we’re coming to that idea from two very different directions. One of our guests studies aquatic predators, like sharks, in an effort to better understand their role in the global ecosystem. The other creates transgenic organisms, like goats with spider genes, in an effort to build new knowledge and solve old problems.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Applied Creativity for Transformation


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Applied Creativity for Transformation
Pub date: 2019-10-17

Brian LaDuca shares about applied creativity for transformation on episode 279 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Brian LaDuca shares about applied creativity for transformation on episode 279 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast

How do you take the concept of novel new knowledge and those aha moments and give them purpose?
-Brian LaDuca

We have to find a way to find these micro campuses on the campus to create pivots.
-Brian LaDuca

It’s the ambiguity that is the lock and key to the content and the resulting action is the tension.
-Brian LaDuca

The right and wrong answer isn’t nearly as important as your ability to filter down ideas, work together in ideas, and move ideas back into the system again.
-Brian LaDuca

Applied creativity inevitably has to be applied to something.
-Brian LaDuca

Meet the student where they are, in what they do, and how they think.
-Brian LaDuca

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Episode 25: Interview with Jackie Njoroge, PhD (Lead of North American Strategy & Innovation)


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Podcast: The Scientific PhD – Now What? Podcast
Episode: Episode 25: Interview with Jackie Njoroge, PhD (Lead of North American Strategy & Innovation)
Pub date: 2019-10-18

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Caroline M. Ritchie, PhD, MBA: PhD Career Coach, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Everybody Act Normal


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Podcast: The Black Goat
Episode: Everybody Act Normal
Pub date: 2019-10-16

Scientists have to follow a lot of rules. We have IRB rules, journal submission rules, university rules – lots of rules. But some of the most important rules in science aren’t rules at all – they are norms. Guiding principles that shape the work we do. In this episode, we discuss a classic paper by the sociologist Robert Merton on 4 norms that govern scientific work. Are these norms an expression of scientific values, or just a means to an end? How well do scientists follow them, individually or collectively? Is science doing as well today as Merton thought it was back in 1942 – and is following these norms really the way to make science work right? Plus: We answer a letter about question to ask a prospective PhD advisor.

Links:

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at [email protected]. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 67. It was recorded on October 8, 2019.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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26 – Increasing Your Impact Beyond Impact Factor


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Podcast: Helium
Episode: 26 – Increasing Your Impact Beyond Impact Factor
Pub date: 2019-05-21

When you think to yourself, how do I make a bigger impact with my research? Are you lost about where to start? It was great to host Mark Reed, host of Fast Track Impact podcast, on this episode. We dove into the questions you should be asking yourself when you want to increase your impact beyond impact factor. We also discussed how to use social media properly for maximum effect. Mark also touched on mental health issues surrounding social media and academia. How do match your values with the time you are spending each week? 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Christine Ogilvie Hendren and Matt Hotze, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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