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BS168 Cecilia Heyes author of “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking”


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Podcast: Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
Episode: BS168 Cecilia Heyes author of “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking”
Pub date: 2020-02-28

BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking.” Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. The proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications.

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1: How do I make people care?


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Podcast: This Study Shows
Episode: 1: How do I make people care?
Pub date: 2019-09-23

If “facts are facts,” why don’t they hold up against skepticism or doubt? Maybe because we need to find the emotional truth inside all of that data. Featuring Mona Chalabi from The Guardian US, Tali Sharot from University College London, and David A. Kirby from University of Manchester.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Wisebuddah & Wiley, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Leap of Faith: Stories about finding and losing faith


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Leap of Faith: Stories about finding and losing faith
Pub date: 2020-02-28

This week we share two stories from people who were confronted with their faith.

Part 1: Feeling like a loser after he fails to graduate on time with his degree in materials science, Len Kruger accepts a dinner invitation from a cult.

Part 2: After young Jehovah’s Witness Emmanuel Garcia loses his faith, he finds a new purpose at a neuroscience conference.

Len Kruger is a writer and storyteller. He recently retired from the Congressional Research Service at the Library of Congress, where he was a Specialist in Science and Technology Policy. Len has performed stories on stage with local storytelling groups such as Story District, the Moth, and Better Said Than Done. His short fiction has appeared in numerous publications including Zoetrope All-Story, The Barcelona Review, and Gargoyle. He has Bachelor of Applied Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Maryland.

Emmanuel (Mani) Garcia is an Indigenous-Black-Latino psychological scientist-practitioner; passionate science communicator; sign language interpreter; group fitness instructor; certified holistic yoga teacher; statistics educator; filmmaker; artist; writer; musician; and cult survivor living in Queens NYC. While completing his PhD in Clinical Psychology at CUNY-John Jay, Mani is focused on developing his recently launched wellness capacity-building movement #Joy4L. His mission with #Joy4L is to increase joy in the lives of all minoritized people by increasing their access to high quality wellness resources. You can follow Mani at: manigarcia.com; Instagram: @bodyweightfun; Twitter: @manigarcianyc.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Marine Mammal Biologist And The Experimental Psychologist


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Marine Mammal Biologist And The Experimental Psychologist
Pub date: 2019-07-12


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking about the way dolphins survive in captivity, and the way humans make decisions based on the chemicals in their bodies.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Robin Dunbar on why we have friends


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Podcast: The Life Scientific
Episode: Robin Dunbar on why we have friends
Pub date: 2019-07-23


Maintaining friendships is one of the most cognitively demanding things we do, according to Professor of Evolutionary Psychology Robin Dunbar. So why do we bother? Robin has spent his life trying to answer this deceptively simple question. For most of his twenties, he lived with a herd of five hundred gelada monkeys in the Ethiopian highlands. He studied their social behaviour and concluded that an ability to get on with each other was just as important as finding food, for the survival of the species. Animals that live in large groups are less likely to get eaten by predators. When funding for animal studies dried up in the 1980s, he turned his attention to humans. and discovered there’s an upper limit to the number of real friends we can have, both in the real world and on social media.
Producer: Anna Buckley

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from BBC Radio 4, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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89: Conflicts of interest in psychology (with Tom Chivers)


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 89: Conflicts of interest in psychology (with Tom Chivers)
Pub date: 2019-08-05

We chat with Tom about whether psychology has a conflict-of-interest problem and how to best define such conflicts.

Links and other stuff we cover…

  • Tom’s article on conflicts of interest in psychology
  • How can we define a conflict an interest without falling down a rabbit hole?
  • Communication statistics to the layperson
  • How science journalism focuses on single studies rather than the larger story
  • Tom’s new book: The AI does not hate you
  • Win Tom’s book! Tweet your favourite Hertz episode and we’ll pick one at random, who’ll get sent Tom’s book
  • How do journalists go about hearing from new voices for story comments?
  • What has Tom changes his mind about?
  • Tom’s book recommendation: Galileo’s Middle Finger

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


Support us on Patreon and get bonus stuff!

  • $1 a month or more: Monthly newsletter + Access to behind-the-scenes photos & video via the Patreon app + the the warm feeling you’re supporting the show
  • $5 a month or more: All the stuff you get in the one dollar tier PLUS a bonus mini episode every month (extras + the bits we couldn’t include in our regular episodes)

Episode citation and permanent link
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2019, August 5) “Conflicts of interest in psychology (with Tom Chivers)”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/F9WBM

Special Guest: Tom Chivers.

Support Everything Hertz

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Ep 167: Dr. Juliet Watson on Researching Gender-based Violence


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 167: Dr. Juliet Watson on Researching Gender-based Violence
Pub date: 2019-08-19

In this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Juliet Watson, the Deputy Director of the Unison Housing Research Lab and the Senior Lecturer in Homelessness in the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT University in Australia. Juliet has extensive research, teaching, and practice experience in the areas of homelessness, gender-based violence, and youth. Her doctoral thesis won the biennial Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association PhD Award in 2016. This research formed the basis for her book, Youth Homelessness and Survival Sex: Intimate Relationships and Gendered Subjectivities. Juliet was also the recipient of The Australian Sociological Association Award for the Most Distinguished Peer-Reviewed Article Published by an Early Career Researcher in 2017. Her current research centres on socio-cultural contexts and experiences of homelessness, social housing, gender-based violence, and poverty. 

Segment 1: Researching Homelessness [00:00-12:25]

In this first segment, Juliet describes her research on homelessness.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Pregnancy and Homelessness [12:26-24:05]

In segment two, Juliet discusses her research on pregnancy and homelessness.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 3: Researching Family and Domestic Violence [24:06-35:48]

In segment three, Juliet shares about considerations when researching vulnerable populations.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: [email protected] Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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3: Where did that idea come from?


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Podcast: This Study Shows
Episode: 3: Where did that idea come from?
Pub date: 2019-09-30

Ideas are the “once upon a time” of the research process. If we think of research as a story, and scientists as the heroes, will we be able to build trust? Featuring Cailin O’Connor from the University of California, Irvine, Friederike Hendriks from the University of Muenster, and Will Storr author of The Science of Storytelling.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Wisebuddah & Wiley, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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