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Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan


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Podcast: ReproducibiliTea Podcast
Episode: Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan
Pub date: 2019-10-15


Episode 25 – Starting A ReproducibiliTea Journal Club With Jade Pickering And Angelika Stefan

Why did we start the ReproducibiliTea Journal club, and how can you start your own? Sam and Amy share their experiences before we listen in on a discussion with two very special guests. Jade Pickering (@Jade_Pickering) and Angelika Stefan (@ephemeralidea) discuss their experiences starting and running a ReproducibiliTea Journal club.

You can find ours, and others’, ReproducibiliTea JC materials (including a starter pack) here: https://osf.io/3qrj6/

visit reproducibilitea.org for more information on starting your own JC, and all the info on the other jcs!

Music credit: Kevin MacLeod – Funkeriffic
freepd.com/misc.php

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ReproducibiliTea Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Transformative and disruptive impact. Part 1 – for your research


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Podcast: Fast Track Impact
Episode: Transformative and disruptive impact. Part 1 – for your research
Pub date: 2019-06-22


This week, Mark asks questions that can enable you to achieve impacts from your research that disrupt old ways of doing things and lead to fundamental transformations in organizations and society. Based on different ways of conceptualizing​ resilience, this episode will make you rethink your ambitions for impact to dream bigger and achieve transformational change.

The questions:

1. How can my research strengthen people and organizations​ so that they are able to withstand or resist change, and continue to provide or get the outcomes or benefits they need?
2. Can my research enable a person or organization​ to change what it does and how it does things so that they can protect their core mission and still achieve the things that are most important to them?
3. How can my research enable people to look completely differently at old problems, or disrupt old ways of doing things, so that people and organizations​​s can do completely new things in new ways that are actually valued more than the old ways of doing things and the things they produced?
4. Can my research help a person or organization become more robust so they can resist change and maintain what’s most important to them in a changing world?

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Mark Reed, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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122: Tenure Tracker – The Life Non-Linear with Dr. Jimena Giudice


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 122: Tenure Tracker – The Life Non-Linear with Dr. Jimena Giudice
Pub date: 2019-10-11

Dr. Jimena Giudice has all the traits of a promising new faculty member.

Through her training and early career, she has earned more than a dozen grants and awards. She’s co-authored two dozen papers. And she has trained students and postdocs, gaining a reputation as a highly effective mentor.

You’d expect that Dr. Giudice’s undeniable success was the natural result of an early immersion in science and a dogged adherence to the well-worn path through college, grad school, and postdoc.

But of course, you’d be wrong. Before discovering a love for scientific research, Dr. Giudice spent ten years answering a different calling.

Changing Focus

Dr. Jimena Giudice

Growing up in Argentina, Jimena didn’t know that her eventual career in science was even an option.

“My parents are architects, my sister is an architect, my cousins are architects, uncles are architects or graphic designers. So I really didn’t have anyone close that I could imagine you could do science as a career,” she recalls.

So after high school, she enrolled in college to study industrial engineering.

Four years into a six year degree, she put her studies on hold and made a personal decision.

“I changed my path, and that’s when I started considering being a nun. I entered a congregation when I was 21.”

Jimena knew that after three years in the congregation, she’d have the opportunity get back to school to continue her studies. Her congregation was focused on education, which gave her valuable experience.

“I was teaching at different levels. Primary school, kindergarten, secondary school, people in the street, rural schools. I was full time working and teaching,” she says.

As her fourth year of service approached, she started to think about what she could study during the next three years that would help in her congregation. She visited the university to explore the available courses, and found that her options expanded well beyond the architecture and engineering paths she had known as a child.

“I remember the first image I have in my head is seeing students with white lab coats and the labs with glass windows and walls. And I have that image in my mind. I said ‘That’s what I want. I want to do that. I want to be with a white lab coat doing what they were doing.’”

That moment was transformative. Afterwards, she says, “I always had the dream of doing experiments, even though I liked education and teaching. Thats when I saw for the first time that science is something where you can study and work and have a career.”

One Good Turn

With her passion for science ignited, Jimena had a new problem. A chemistry degree in Argentina takes six years, but her congregation allowed just three years to pursue a degree while also working during the day.

She did the majority her classes at night, and traveled an hour and a half between the community where she lived and the university.

“I had to multi-task a lot of things. My philosophy was: when I am in classes, I am in classes, and I have to get as much as I can from here because I don’t have a lot of time to study at home,” she remembers.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Marriage: Stories about making it work


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Marriage: Stories about making it work
Pub date: 2019-07-05

Part 1:  After turning down a tenure position, Sarah Brady struggles to adapt to her new life as the spouse of a physician.

Part 2:  As he grows up, Ed Greco’s two great loves — his high school sweetheart, and physics — come into conflict.

Sarah Brady is a storyteller, teaching artist, and writer who relocated to England from the United States a year and a half ago due to her paediatrician husband’s job. To say that science has had an impact on her family would be an understatement.

For the last ten years, Ed Greco has taught physics at Georgia Tech where he has been active in the development of new curriculum for undergraduate students. A native Floridian, he moved to Atlanta in 2000 with his high school sweetheart to attend graduate school. When not in the classroom, he coordinates the outreach activities for the school of physics and serves as radio show co-host “Fat Daddy Sorghum” on WREK’s Inside the Black Box where he enjoys sharing his passion for science with the Atlanta community. Photography, Conchology, foraging for wild edibles, and exploring Appalachia on a motorcycle are just a few of his varied pastimes. Mostly, however, he enjoys spending quality times with his loving family.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Community Ecologist And The Mathematical Physicist


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Community Ecologist And The Mathematical Physicist
Pub date: 2019-09-22


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking to a researcher who’s demonstrated that some insects may actually benefit from pesticides. Then, we’ll chat with a string theorist who is uncoupling ideas about the universe faster than you can say “Nikulin involution.”

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Diversity in Open Science


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Podcast: Marginally Significant
Episode: Diversity in Open Science
Pub date: 2019-08-31

Is open science open to everyone? Are there potential costs to engaging in open science practices? Should diversity be a core value of open science? In this episode we attempt to tackle these potentially polarizing questions.


Marginally Significant is hosted by:
Andrew Smith @andrewrsmith
Twila Wingrove @twilawingrove
Andrew Monroe @monroeandrew
Chris Holden @profcjholden

You can contact Marginally Significant on Twitter (@marginallysig), through email ([email protected]), or on the web (marginallysignificant.fireside.fm/contact).

Links:

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Andrew Smith, Twila Wingrove, Andrew Monroe, and Chris Holden, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Rosa Arriaga on transferrable discipline toolkits, making a difference, & caring for the grad student journey


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Podcast: Changing Academic Life
Episode: Rosa Arriaga on transferrable discipline toolkits, making a difference, & caring for the grad student journey
Pub date: 2019-10-10

See http://www.changingacademiclife.com/blog/2019/10/5/rosa-arriaga for a time-stamped overview of the conversation and related links.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Geraldine Fitzpatrick, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Does Practice Make Perfect? – Brooke Macnamara


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Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: Does Practice Make Perfect? – Brooke Macnamara
Pub date: 2019-10-01


In striving to develop expertise, are 10,000 hours of deliberate practice really required, and must it be guided by a teacher or coach? In episode 59, we’re joined by Brooke Macnamara from Case Western Reserve University. She’ll discuss her attempted replication of the study which led to the mantra popularized by Malcolm Gladwell that these parameters are required to master a task.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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