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Innovator Stories – Episode 1


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Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Innovator Stories – Episode 1
Episode pub date: 2019-03-29

What makes an innovator in the world of disrupting science? What sort of experiences, behaviours and mindsets prompt people to make change, and guard them against the challenges that changing the status quo inevitably brings?

Those were the questions on our mind for this first episode of our ‘Innovator Stories’ mini-series on the Science: Disrupt podcast.

Over the next 5 episodes of Science: Disrupt, you’ll hear from those at the coal face, enacting change within science – whether that’s building new products, changing behaviour in the lab or simply being more vocal in the scientific community, we wanted to bring to the fore some of the ‘behind the scenes’ insights into what makes innovation happen.

This episode features:

  • Michele Nuitjen, Assistant Professor at Tilburg University
  • Leslie McIntosh, Co-Founder and CEO of Ripeta
  • Freyja Olafsdottir, Neuroscientist at the Donders Institute

The series is supported by the awesome team at Digital Science’s Catalyst Grant – they’re constantly searching for the next big thing in scientific research software. To help nurture original, early stage ideas they created the Catalyst Grant where they offer up to £25,000 to help get your idea from concept to prototype. So, if you’ve got an idea to help further scientific research, then they’ve got the funding and resources to bring it to life. The next deadline for submission is June 30th, so get to it!

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Episode 69: Data Driven Discovery


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Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 69: Data Driven Discovery
Episode pub date: 2019-04-10

In this episode we chat to Charles Fracchia, CEO and Co-Founder of BioBright a bioscience data company driven to make labs faster and smarter. Showing that building out a smart lab isn’t the preserve of the roboticists, Biobright hoovers up every drop of experimental data with a view to make science more reproducible. Their product ‘DarwinSync’ can hook up to you electronic lab notebooks, be searched through voice, and can even help with the analysis and visualisation of lab data.

Charles’ CV reads like a who’s who of science innovation, from his IBM PhD Fellowship in the MIT Media Lab, to working in George Church’s lab at the Wyss Institute. He was also an early intern at Ginkgo Bioworks. He’s even been named one of 35 Innovators Under 35 by the MIT Technology Review.

Relevant articles:

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Episode 57: Experimenting with Crowdfunding


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Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 57: Experimenting with Crowdfunding
Episode pub date: 2018-07-17

This week we chat to Cindy Wu and Denny Luan, co-founders of Experiment, the science crowdfunding platform. 

We talk about the underappreciated power of small chunks of funding in science, different methods of sharing science, and bonding over super-smash bros.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 66: Vaccines: Tackling Viral Misinformation


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Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 66: Vaccines: Tackling Viral Misinformation
Episode pub date: 2019-02-10

In today’s episode we are joined by Richard Clarke, a PhD researcher at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine! Richard is a member of the the Vaccine Confidence Project, an initiative that monitors public confidence in immunisation for the purpose of detecting public concerns around vaccines. These concerns can have massive implications for the effectiveness of vaccine programmes and as such researchers must address them as early as possible.

In this episode we explore what researchers can do to effectively communicate science on-and-off-line (it turns out caps lock, insults, and twitter mobs aren’t very convincing…), and the results of his research that suggests that on the whole people are less vulnerable to online pseudoscience than we might think. We also chat about his involvement in the Skeptic community, and the role that public trust in authority plays in vaccine hesitancy.

Richard’s PhD focusses on the information seeking behaviours of mothers as they make a vaccine decision during pregnancy. In his studies Richard applies research from the psychology of decision making, trust and the field of information science to quantitatively investigate how mothers engage in information gathering to aid decision making with respect to the pertussis vaccine currently offered during pregnancy. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 54: The Road to Open Science Hardware

Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 54: The Road to Open Science Hardware
Episode pub date: 2018-03-29

We’re back from a little pod hiatus!

In this episode we spoke to Dr Jenny Molloy, a Cambridge Synthetic Biologist who, among many things, is the Director of the Cambridge Biomakespace, and is on the organising committee for the Gathering for Open Science Hardware

We spoke about her work in developing the GOSH manifesto, and the recently released Open Science Hardware Roadmap which advocates for open science hardware as a ubiquitous component of everyday lab life. We also dove into the space that hardware fits into, in the ever active Open Science community. How do the open hardware advocates differ from those keen to shake up academic publishing.

We were also keen to find out more on how open science hardware projects are disseminated, not just to the fellow academics but to the wider public at large. And how this area of ‘science disruption’ could have a massive impact on the reproducibility of research.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 64: Event Special – Disrupting the Conversation

Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 64: Event Special – Disrupting the Conversation
Episode pub date: 2019-01-24

**Special episode klaxon**

It’s no secret that the internet has changed the way we communicate, and the last 12 months has also made clear the realisation that it has also changed the way we form our views. On December 5th 2018 we ran an event on Science communication called Disrupting the Conversation (kindly sponsored by Digital Science) on how to battle against misinformation, and effectively communicate scientific ideas.

The panel were:

Time stamps:

  • Stephen Buranyi – (00:01:25)
  • Professor Ruth Morgan – 00:05:05
  • Richard Clarke – 00:23:00
  • Dr Alice Bell – 00:47:40
  • Panel Discussion – 01:11:20

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 60: Why Science Needs Advertising

Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 60: Why Science Needs Advertising
Episode pub date: 2018-11-02

In this episode we spoke to Karen Mazurkewich the Lead Executive of  Communications & Marketing at MaRS, Toronto’s startup hub. Karen was also formerly a journalist with the Wall Street Journal.

We were keen to understand the Toronto startup ecosystem, and the state of science entrepreneurialism in the Six. We also wanted to get Karen’s perspective on science communication. Karen wrote a nice piece in the Harvard Business Review way back in April 2018 about how technologists and scientists should let in trained storytellers to effectively share their research.

 

 

 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.