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Ep. 70: Why Trust Science? with Author Naomi Oreskes


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Podcast: Got Science?
Episode: Ep. 70: Why Trust Science? with Author Naomi Oreskes
Pub date: 2019-10-22


Science Historian Naomi Oreskes explains why science’s social character makes it trustworthy, and what we can learn from science’s past.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Union of Concerned Scientists, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Aquatic Ecologist And The Biological Engineer


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Aquatic Ecologist And The Biological Engineer
Pub date: 2019-10-20


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking about risk and, as we like to do, we’re coming to that idea from two very different directions. One of our guests studies aquatic predators, like sharks, in an effort to better understand their role in the global ecosystem. The other creates transgenic organisms, like goats with spider genes, in an effort to build new knowledge and solve old problems.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Applied Creativity for Transformation


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Applied Creativity for Transformation
Pub date: 2019-10-17

Brian LaDuca shares about applied creativity for transformation on episode 279 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Brian LaDuca shares about applied creativity for transformation on episode 279 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast

How do you take the concept of novel new knowledge and those aha moments and give them purpose?
-Brian LaDuca

We have to find a way to find these micro campuses on the campus to create pivots.
-Brian LaDuca

It’s the ambiguity that is the lock and key to the content and the resulting action is the tension.
-Brian LaDuca

The right and wrong answer isn’t nearly as important as your ability to filter down ideas, work together in ideas, and move ideas back into the system again.
-Brian LaDuca

Applied creativity inevitably has to be applied to something.
-Brian LaDuca

Meet the student where they are, in what they do, and how they think.
-Brian LaDuca

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Episode 25: Interview with Jackie Njoroge, PhD (Lead of North American Strategy & Innovation)


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Podcast: The Scientific PhD – Now What? Podcast
Episode: Episode 25: Interview with Jackie Njoroge, PhD (Lead of North American Strategy & Innovation)
Pub date: 2019-10-18

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Caroline M. Ritchie, PhD, MBA: PhD Career Coach, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Everybody Act Normal


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Podcast: The Black Goat
Episode: Everybody Act Normal
Pub date: 2019-10-16

Scientists have to follow a lot of rules. We have IRB rules, journal submission rules, university rules – lots of rules. But some of the most important rules in science aren’t rules at all – they are norms. Guiding principles that shape the work we do. In this episode, we discuss a classic paper by the sociologist Robert Merton on 4 norms that govern scientific work. Are these norms an expression of scientific values, or just a means to an end? How well do scientists follow them, individually or collectively? Is science doing as well today as Merton thought it was back in 1942 – and is following these norms really the way to make science work right? Plus: We answer a letter about question to ask a prospective PhD advisor.

Links:

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at [email protected]. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 67. It was recorded on October 8, 2019.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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26 – Increasing Your Impact Beyond Impact Factor


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Podcast: Helium
Episode: 26 – Increasing Your Impact Beyond Impact Factor
Pub date: 2019-05-21

When you think to yourself, how do I make a bigger impact with my research? Are you lost about where to start? It was great to host Mark Reed, host of Fast Track Impact podcast, on this episode. We dove into the questions you should be asking yourself when you want to increase your impact beyond impact factor. We also discussed how to use social media properly for maximum effect. Mark also touched on mental health issues surrounding social media and academia. How do match your values with the time you are spending each week? 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Christine Ogilvie Hendren and Matt Hotze, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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UnDisciplined: The Computational Pedagogist And The Undead Philosopher


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Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: UnDisciplined: The Computational Pedagogist And The Undead Philosopher
Pub date: 2019-05-10


This week on UnDisciplined, we’re talking about math education and … zombies? If those two things seem like they don’t have anything to do with each other, well, that’s the idea. On our show, we bring together researchers from vastly different areas of study, and we ask them to build connections. And that takes … brains. Get it?

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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113: All Work and Some Play – Isaac Childres on Following Your Passion After a PhD


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 113: All Work and Some Play – Isaac Childres on Following Your Passion After a PhD
Pub date: 2019-05-01

Sometimes, a graduate school education follows the strait and narrow path through dissertation, postdoc, and faculty position.

And sometimes, it sprouts wings and takes you somewhere else entirely.

That was the experience for Isaac Childress. Isaac began his career as a physics PhD studying high-energy particles. But “Plan A” didn’t turn out exactly as he expected.

Instead he found his muse in board games, and worked to design one of the top-rated games in history.

Isaac Childres, PhD – founder of Cephalofair Games and designer of Gloomhaven

This week we talk to Isaac about the downs, and ups, of his non-traditional career path.

For Isaac, graduate school was a struggle with plenty of disappointments and feelings of failure. But outside the lab, he found inspiration while playing board and video games with his friends. As he played, he started to notice game dynamics that could be better. He imagined story lines and player interactions that would be both fun and challenging.

Near the end of his graduate training, Isaac had designed a game called Forge War and had tested it with friends and reviewers. He set up a Kickstarter to see if maybe, just maybe, he’d earn enough support to actually get it published.

The kickstarter brought in over $100,000.

Isaac followed up Forge War with his award-winning Gloomhaven game, and the rest, as they say, is history. This physics PhD was building worlds, testing game dynamics, and ultimately, delighting players around the globe.

We hear about everything from the time he was kicked out of his research group to the moment he knew his board game Kickstarter was going to be something special.

If you’ve ever wondered if there’s a place for you outside the lab or in the world beyond graduate school, Isaac’s story is sure to inspire.

Just make sure you look before you leap. Isaac concludes, “It’s alway good to have a backup plan before you start pursuing your dreams…”

Find Isaac Childres at Cephalofair.com or on Twitter @cephalofair.

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This week’s refreshment comes once again from listener Adrian who shares the TROPICÁLIA American IPA from Creature Comforts Brewing in Athens, GA. It’s the perfect not-too-bitter finish to a sunny spring day.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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