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120: Advancing Open Science with Dr. Jon Tennant


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 120: Advancing Open Science with Dr. Jon Tennant
Episode pub date: 2019-09-07

As a researcher, you may brag about the open, collegial way that scientists share their findings in lab meetings, poster sessions, and journal articles.

But if you dig beneath the surface, you’ll find a darker tendency built into our habits and institutions that actually cover up a lot of what we learn.

For example, you might spend months testing the efficacy of a new cancer drug in vitro. But if that drug doesn’t have a significant impact on cancer growth, you’ll conclude your work is ‘not publishable,’ and the discovery will languish in your lab notebook.

Meanwhile, in some other lab, at some other University, another scientist might get the same idea you had, and spend their own weeks or months doing the same tests, only to learn the same result.

And so, year after year, the research community wastes immeasurable time re-learning the same lessons. And because of that, the march toward real insights and real cures slows to a crawl.

This week on the show, we talk with Jon Tennant, PhD, who wants to re-open the channels of scientific communication and transform the way we build on what others have learned.

Open Source Science

The “Open Science” movement goes far beyond sharing negative results. It builds on the “Open Source” software movement that has been vital to the software engineering community for a generation.

It encompasses all aspects of the scientific process, from planning experiments to sharing raw data to educating the public.

Jon described just a handful of ways that scientists are opening their methods to the wider world.

The first idea is the microPublication. Rather than gathering reams of data in the hopes of crafting a ‘story’ that a journal is willing to pick up, micropublishing focuses on sharing the results of individual experiments – pushing the data out to other scientists as they happen. In this way, you can collaborate in near-real-time, and inspire new paths of inquiry – even if the original idea doesn’t pan out.

Another way to open your research is through pre-registration. In this mode, you present your hypothesis and research plan to a third party for review before you begin to collect data. That way, no matter the result, the world gets to learn about your experimental approach and whether the hypothesis was supported or rejected.

While these novel modes of publication might sound exciting, they can have a hard time gaining traction in an academic setting where the Impact Factor of a journal can mean a promotion or a dismissal. How are postdocs and junior faculty members supposed to adopt these new publishing methods when the hiring or tenure committee puts so much stock in the ‘top-tier journals?’

Weaning academics from their addiction to Cell, Science, and Nature requires a cultural solution. The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment encourages signatories in academia and funding agencies to look beyond the Journal Impact Factor when making hiring and funding decisions.

They highlight “the need to assess research on its own merits rather than on the basis of the journal in which the research is published.”

Another campaign called “Free Our Knowledge” takes the pledge for open science on…

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Engaging Learners in Large Classes


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Engaging Learners in Large Classes
Episode pub date: 2019-09-05

Bonni Stachowiak shares about engaging learners in large classes on episode 273 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast

Quotes from the episode

Engaging Learners in Large ClassesThe act of predicting can enhance our learning.
—Bonni Stachowiak

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Ewine van Dishoeck on cosmic chemistry


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Podcast: The Life Scientific
Episode: Ewine van Dishoeck on cosmic chemistry
Episode pub date: 2019-07-02


Ewine van Dishoeck has spent her life studying the space between the stars. Not so long ago, interstellar space was thought to be an empty, sterile void. The idea that there would be organic molecules in interstellar clouds was absurd. Ewine, however, has revealed that there are some astonishingly sophisticated organic molecules in space. The molecules that are needed to form the building blocks of life were formed long before planets emerged from these swirling clouds of interstellar dust. Jim talks to Ewine, winner of the 2018 Kavli Prize for Astrophysics, about quantum chemistry, astronomy and why we need to keep building telescopes. Do Ewine’s discoveries make it more likely that we will find life elsewhere in the universe?

Producer: Anna Buckley

Main Image: Ewine van Dishoeck receiving the Kavli Prize in astrophysics, 4 September 2018 in Oslo. Credit: Berit Roald / NTB SCANPIX / AFP) / Norway

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Better Onboarding Onto Your Team


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Podcast: Helium
Episode: Better Onboarding Onto Your Team
Episode pub date: 2019-08-13

Creating your own style as a team leader means gathering the best ideas that are out there and adapting them to your personality. We asked 9 different podcast hosts to join the show to share their best ideas for onboarding others into teams or groups. They discuss positives and negatives have they experienced when being onboarded themselves. The bonus is that you also get to hear from 8 great shows that are for you as academics. Download this episode to find great onboarding ideas and your next podcast (or podcasts) to subscribe to. Creating your own style as a team leader means gathering the best ideas that are out there and adapting them to your personality. We asked 9 different podcast hosts to join the show to share their best ideas for onboarding others into teams or groups. They discuss positives and negatives have they experienced when being onboarded themselves. The bonus is that you also get to hear from 8 great shows that are for you as academics. Download this episode to find great onboarding ideas and your next podcast (or podcasts) to subscribe to.  Show notes: www.teamhelium.co/episode32

Shows included are: (1) The Contingent Professor (2) Personal Finance for PhDs (3) Fast Track Impact (4) Working Scientists (from Nature Careers) (5) Grad Blogger (6) Research in Action (7) PhD Career Stories (8) Teaching in Higher Ed

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Episode 21: The Future of Work and What It Means for Higher Ed


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Podcast: Future U Podcast
Episode: Episode 21: The Future of Work and What It Means for Higher Ed
Episode pub date: 2018-10-23


McKinsey Global Institute partner Susan Lund talks with Michael about what’s on the horizon for the workforce and the economy and how it will affect the future of higher education.

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Ep 168: Dr. Paul Eaton on Post-Qualitative Inquiry


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 168: Dr. Paul Eaton on Post-Qualitative Inquiry
Episode pub date: 2019-08-26

In this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Paul William Eaton, an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at Sam Houston State University. Paul’s research interests include inquiries into digital technologies in education and human identity~subjectification~becoming; digital pedagogy and learning; postqualitative, complexivist, and posthumanist inquiry; and curriculum theorizing-philosophy in the realms of postsecondary education and student affairs. He serves as Assistant Editor for the Higher Education section of the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing and on the Editorial Review Board of the Journal Committed to Social Change on Race & Ethnicity. He is the co-author of Troubling Method: Narrative Research as Being (Peter Lang Press, 2018, with Petra Munro Hendry & Roland Mitchell). His research has appeared in the Review of Higher Education, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Thresholds in Education, and the Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education & Student Affairs, among others. He received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in May 2015, his master’s degree from the University of Maryland College Park in 2005, and his bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in 2002. Follow Paul on Twitter and Instagram @profpeaton. His blog is located at: https://www.profpeaton.com.

Segment 1: Postqualitative, Complexivist, and Posthumanist Inquiry [00:00-17:40]

In this first segment, Paul defines the terms he uses to describe his research.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Research as Ontology [17:41-36:28]

In segment two, Paul talks about his research as a way of life.

Bonus Clip [00:00-04:10]: Collaborative Research

In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned:

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: [email protected] Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Marzyeh Ghassemi | Applying Machine Learning to Understand and Improve Health


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Podcast: Women in Data Science
Episode: Marzyeh Ghassemi | Applying Machine Learning to Understand and Improve Health
Episode pub date: 2019-08-28

Ghassemi explains how she is tackling two issues: eradicating bias in healthcare data and models, and understanding what it means to be healthy across different populations during her conversation with Women in Data Science Co-Director Karen Matthys on the Women in Data Science podcast.

She says that there are built-in biases in data, access to care, treatments, and outcomes. If we train models on data that is biased, it will operationalize those biases. Her goal is to recognize and eliminate those biases in the data and the models. For example, research shows that end-of-life care for minorities is significantly more aggressive. “This mistrust between patient and provider, which we can capture and model algorithmically, is predictive of who gets this aggressive end-of-life care.”

Ghassemi is also interested in the fundamental question of what it means to be healthy, and whether that rule generalizes. It requires a different mode for data collection and analysis. She explains that the typical process is that data is generated when you go to the doctor because you are sick. However, what matters more than your infrequent doctor check-in is how you’re experiencing things day to day, the self-report. She sees a huge opportunity in combining doctor visit data, self-reported data and data from wearable devices that’s passively collected from people that consent to their behavioral data being used. We can use all of those different kinds of data modalities to understand what it means to be healthy for all kinds of people.

She also offers valuable insights from her career in data science as a woman, a minority and a mother. She is a visible minority because she chooses to wear a headscarf. “I became comfortable very early on with defending choices that I had made about my life. And that for me really was instrumental in the academic process. Because what is academia if not constant rejection?”

Ghassemi made the decision to become a mother while pursuing her PhD. “As a society we should recognize that having kids is not a career hit.” She felt she was able to have kids and be successful as a graduate student because there was a community around her that was supportive and recognized that having children would enrich her life and experience. She credits having a supportive mentor as being instrumental in making it all work, saying, “You have to choose the race that you can be successful at.”

She wants young women entering the field to know there is no one defined path. She says don’t worry about checking boxes. Choose things that you are very passionate about. Find a mentor who’s willing to invest in you, and the path you want to take. Surround yourself with good people. It’s not the project that makes you successful; it’s the people. If you can’t trust the people around you, and learn how to work together, you are going to fail. Having the right mentors and having the right people around you should always be your guiding star.

RELATED LINKS
Connect with Marzyeh Ghassemi on Twitter (@MarzyehGhassemi) and LinkedIn
Find out more about Marzyeh on her personal website
Read more about the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and Vector Institute
Interview with Marzyeh: Artificial Intelligence Could Improve Health Care for All — Unless it Doesn’t
Connect with Margot Gerritsen on Twitter (@margootjeg) and LinkedIn
Find out more about Margot on her Stanford Profile
Find out more about Margot on her personal website

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