Audio

497: Protecting the World’s Most Peaceful Primates – Dr. Karen Strier


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: People Behind the Science Podcast – Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
Episode: 497: Protecting the World’s Most Peaceful Primates – Dr. Karen Strier
Episode pub date: 2019-04-15

Dr. Karen Strier is the Vilas Research Professor and Irven Devore Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Karen is a Primate behavioral ecologist. She is working to understand the biological basis of human behavior, evolution, and adaptation by studying our closest living relatives. Research in Karen’s group involves observing a critically endangered primate, the northern muriqui, in its natural habitat to understand how their behaviors are similar to or different from human behaviors. When she’s not in the lab or observing primates in the wild, Karen enjoys being outside, going for walks in nature, cooking delicious multi-course meals for her friends and family, reading, and spending time with her cats. Karen received her B.A. in Sociology/Anthropology and Biology from Swarthmore College, and she was awarded her M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard University. After completing her Ph.D., Karen served as a lecturer at Harvard University and subsequently became a faculty member at Beloit College. She joined the faculty at UW-Madison in 1989. Karen has received numerous honors and awards throughout her career, including being elected as a Fellow of the American Anthropological Association, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In addition, she is an Honorary Member of the Latin American Society of Primatologists and the Brazilian Society of Primatologists, and she has received an Honorary Doctoral Degree from the University of Chicago. Karen has been the recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, the H.I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship, Kellett Mid-Career Faculty Researcher Award, and WARF Professorship from UW-Madison, the Hilldale Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research & Public Service from UW-Madison, and the Distinguished Primatologist Awards from the American Society of Primatologists and the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is currently the President of the International Primatological Society. In our interview Karen shares more about her life and science.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Marie McNeely, featuring top scientists speaking about their life and career in science!, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Episode 11: Interview with Rachel Lane, PhD, RD (Science Communications Consultant)


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: The Scientific PhD – Now What? Podcast
Episode: Episode 11: Interview with Rachel Lane, PhD, RD (Science Communications Consultant)
Episode pub date: 2018-08-12

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Caroline M. Ritchie, PhD, MBA: PhD Career Coach, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Dual-Career Academic Track


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: Vanderbilt Beyond the Lab podcast
Episode: Dual-Career Academic Track
Episode pub date: 2019-01-15

Join us as we hear from two alumni couples, Dr. Leslie Kwakye and Dr. Gunnar Kwakye at Oberlin College and Dr. Michelle Mazei-Robison and Dr. AJ Robison at Michigan State University, all couples currently in faculty roles at the same university. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Vanderbilt University, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Episode 15 – Responding To The Fallibility Of Others


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: ReproducibiliTea Podcast
Episode: Episode 15 – Responding To The Fallibility Of Others
Episode pub date: 2019-03-06


Episode 15 – Responding To The Fallibility Of Others

In this second part-er we revisit Dorothy Bishop’s “Fallibility in Science: Responding to Errors in the Work of Oneself and Others”. Last episode we discussed responding to one’s own errors. We got so wrapped up that we didn’t get onto responding to others errors. So, we’re back;

Highlights:
How should we respond to other’s errors
Oh my god this is complicated and has so many grey areas, including;
– Does career stage matter?
– Does the profile of the work matter?
– should we, and when should we, contact the authors to let them know of errors, and what are the complications with this?
We also dive into the idea of commenting on the research, rather than the researcher and discuss the value of this.

What do you think? hit our twitter, DMs, and email to continue the chat!

Music Credit:
Kevin MacLeod – Funkerrific

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ReproducibiliTea Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Moshe Vardi on publication pressures, student stress, mid-career mentoring & societal obligations


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: Changing Academic Life
Episode: Moshe Vardi on publication pressures, student stress, mid-career mentoring & societal obligations
Episode pub date: 2019-04-01

See http://www.changingacademiclife.com/blog/2019/3/31/moshe-vardi for a time-stamped overview of the conversation and related links.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Geraldine Fitzpatrick, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Joshua Miller Discusses the Hot Hand Phenomenon (Podcast)


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: Masters in Business
Episode: Joshua Miller Discusses the Hot Hand Phenomenon (Podcast)
Episode pub date: 2019-03-28


Bloomberg Opinion columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Joshua Miller, an economics professor at the University of Alicante whose research interests include behavioral economics and decision theory. His paper “Surprised By the Hot Hand Fallacy? A Truth in the Law of Small Numbers,” co-authored with Adam Sanjurjo, recently appeared in the journal Econometrica. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Bloomberg News, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

Ep 147: Christopher Plummer on Research and Creative Expression


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 147: Christopher Plummer on Research and Creative Expression
Episode pub date: 2019-02-25

On this episode, Katie is joined by Christopher Plummer, Professor at Michigan Technological University. Christopher created the Sound programs at Michigan Technological University, which combine fundamental engineering and artistic course work with applied sound creation. He has long been a practicing sound designer with theatre designs at regional theaters and in New York, sound design for independent films, and PBS specials. In that work he has been keenly interested in how immersive sound and room acoustics can bypass our conscious awareness and impact our underlying emotional state. This work includes the way an electroacoustic system can help an opera singer touch an audience with their voice to how the acoustics of a room change the classroom dynamics of a pre-school. Recently, Christopher has been exploring the power of soundscapes through a National Endowment for The Arts funded project, “Listening to Parks.” This project takes images and ambisonic recordings of the National Parks surrounding Lake Superior and creates a virtual retreat where the park experiences are shared through an immersive installation using 11 speakers and 6 screens to transport the audience. New programs continue to be developed for this system, most recently, “Shell Shocked,” a virtual experience of World War I warfare as part of the Copper Country’s remembrance of the 100 year anniversary of the Armistice.

Segment 1: Sound Design and Composition [00:00-18:17]

In this first segment, Christopher describes his work with sound design and music composition.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Research and Creative Expression [18:18-37:03]

In segment two, Christopher shares how his creative work impacts his research.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-06:11]: The Core Principle of Christopher’s Work

In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned:

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: [email protected] Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes
Audio

111: Empowering the Impossible with Citizen Science


Save to Listen Later

Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 111: Empowering the Impossible with Citizen Science
Episode pub date: 2019-04-01

It looks like a cross between an anteater and a hedgehog, but don’t let that description fool you into believing it’s easy to spot an echidna in the wild. These denizens of the Down Under know how to hide.

“They’re really understudied in Australia because they’re hard to find in the wild,” says Tahlia Perry, a graduate student at the University of Adelaide who has staked her graduate career on studying these rather shy creatures.

Crowd Sourced Science

“If you do find one you might not see the same animal for a couple of years in the same area. Even if you do put a tracker on them, you sort of know they’re in a couple of meter radius around you but you still can’t find them because they’re really good at hiding and they just disappear into the soil.”

Tahlia’s project aims to understand more than just the distribution and habits of the echidna; she’s studying the foods they eat, their hormone balance, and their microbiome.

And for that, she needs to collect echidna scats (i.e. poo!) for analysis in the lab.

It’s difficult to generate enough data to finish a PhD with just one or two echidna sightings a year, so Tahlia and her team had to think bigger.

They developed an app called EchidnaCSI that users across Australia can download to their phones to participate in the project.

EchidnaCSI allows citizen scientists to snap photos of echidnas they see around the neighborhood or in the wild. Those photos are uploaded to the University’s servers with date and time information, as well as the phone’s geolocation, giving Tahlia vital data about where, and when, echidnas can be found across the continent.

To understand the food choices and microbiome of these creatures, the app-participants can contribute in a slightly less orthodox way…

“I’m getting the general public to basically collect echidna poo for me from across Australia,” Tahlia summarizes with a laugh.

But the value of average citizens dropping poo in the mail is anything but laughable. Tahlia’s team can use those samples “to tell us who that echidna is, if it’s healthy, stressed or reproductively active. And so we can learn more about these wild populations without having to track or capture any of these animals.”

And that’s the point – pun intended – of EchidnaCSI. It stands for “Echidna Conservation Science Initiative.”

When we met Tahlia, she was attending the Citizen Science Conference, where nearly a thousand scientists, teachers, students, and enthusiasts met to talk about the ways that valuable research is assisted by curious and engaged citizens.

Citizen Science is growing in popularity as researchers leverage the crowd to understand bird migration, water quality, insect habits, and weather patterns.

Tahlia sums up the problem, and the solution, perfectly:

“There is no way I’d be physically able to do it myself. Even with a team of scientists there’s no way we’d be able to collect this many sightings, this many scats, or go to these sorts of locations. The budget alone and the time alone – I would be doing this for the next 40 years of my life if I wanted to get thi…

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Powered by: ListenNotes