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Episode 16 – Data Visualization With Giorgia Lupi


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Podcast: Superwomen in Science
Episode: Episode 16 – Data Visualization With Giorgia Lupi
Episode pub date: 2019-01-24


Welcome back to our 16th episode, all about Data Visualization! We start off by chatting about how zines can be an accessible alternative way to communicate science, or advocate for the people doing science. Next up, we learn about science illustrator and botanist, Mary Agnes Chaste. We were joined by the amazing and talented Giorgia Lupi to discuss how her theory of Data Humanism has shaped her career in the field of data viz. We wrap up the episode by talking with Sasha Ariel Alston, an inspiring coder leading the way for the next generation with her book, Sasha Savvy Loves to Code. Enjoy!

Zines (free downloadable PDFs!):
Lab Notes on Power in Academia https://academicstakingaction.wordpress.com/zine/
Neuroscientist Portrait Project: https://www.patreon.com/posts/print-your-own-7762006
Two Photon Art: https://twophotonart.com/

Mary Agnes Chaste read from Rachel Ignotofsky’s Women in Science: https://www.rachelignotofskydesign.com/women-in-science/

Giorgia Lupi:
Website: http://giorgialupi.com/
Twitter: @giorgialupi
Instagram: @giorgialupi
Pinterest: @giorgialupi
Bruises – The Data We Don’t See: https://medium.com/@giorgialupi/bruises-the-data-we-dont-see-1fdec00d0036

Sasha Ariel Alston:
Twitter: @TheStemQueen
Sasha Savvy Loves to Code: https://www.amazon.com/Sasha-Savvy-Loves-Ariel-Alston/dp/0997135425/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1497055755&sr=8-1&keywords=sasha+savvy+loves+to+code

Follow us on social media!
Twitter: @SuperwomenSci
Instagram: @SuperwomenScience
Facebook: Superwomen in Science Podcast

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Superwomen in Science, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Is There Really Wisdom in the Crowd?

Podcast: [email protected]
Episode: Is There Really Wisdom in the Crowd?
Episode pub date: 2019-01-29


New Wharton research says that a better way to crowdsource ideas is to avoid the most popular answer to a question and select the “surprisingly popular” one.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from [email protected], which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Frank Close and particle physics

Podcast: The Life Scientific
Episode: Frank Close and particle physics
Episode pub date: 2018-06-12


Frank Close is a theoretical particle physicist and a pioneer of popular writing about physics. His first book aimed at a non-specialist audience, The Cosmic Onion, was published 35 years ago. His latest, Half Life, is the story of physicist and spy, Bruno Pontecorvo. Frank has also had a distinguished research career studying the fundamental structure of matter. It was during his PhD in the late 60s that quarks were discovered. These are the fundamental entities we now know make up particles such as protons and neutrons, which in turn make up the nuclei of atoms, and therefore all of us and everything around us. Frank Close went on to make a name for himself studying what holds the quarks together inside matter. Among his many best-selling books was his thorough account of the controversial claims about the discovery of cold fusion – the idea of unlimited fusion energy in a test tube – and which brought the remarkable story to the world’s attention in his book Too Hot to Handle. Frank has spent most of his working life around the Thames Valley – at the Rutherford Appleton Labs, and now at the University of Oxford where is an emeritus professor of physics. In front of an audience at the Cheltenham Science Festival Jim al-Khalili discusses physics and writing with Frank Close.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from BBC Radio 4, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 67: The Science of Storytelling

Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Episode 67: The Science of Storytelling
Episode pub date: 2019-02-23

In this episode we chat to science writer, podcaster, speaker, author, and now communications consultant Dr Kat Arney on all things science communication! We dive into the current state of the science communication industry, from the tools of the trade, things that ‘scicommers’ can improve, and the work Kat does training researchers in the art of storytelling.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Ep 147: Christopher Plummer on Research and Creative Expression – Bonus Clip # 1 – The Core Principle of Christopher’s Work

Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 147: Christopher Plummer on Research and Creative Expression – Bonus Clip # 1 – The Core Principle of Christopher’s Work
Episode pub date: 2019-02-25

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-06:11]: The Core Principle of Christopher’s Work

In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned:

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: [email protected] Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Analytics in Baseball: How More Data Changes the Game

Podcast: [email protected]
Episode: Analytics in Baseball: How More Data Changes the Game
Episode pub date: 2019-02-21


Deal sizes and tenures in baseball signings are at the receiving end of a stronger focus on how the stats add up, say experts.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from [email protected], which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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In Love with Science: Stories about Loving Science

Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: In Love with Science: Stories about Loving Science
Episode pub date: 2019-02-08


This week, we’re presenting two stories from people who made science their one and only..

Part 1: Parmvir Bahia struggles to appease her parents’ desires for an Indian son-in-law while also satisfying her own desires to be a scientist.

Part 2: Monica Dunford’s journey through the less glamorous side of particle physics leads to a realization in front of the most glamorous side of physics.

Parmvir Bahia is a short, British-Indian, neuroscience  PhD working at the University of South Florida. She studies the role of  nerves in the respiratory system and how they might hold the key to  understanding diseases like asthma and COPD. When not researching or  writing long lists of self-describing adjectives she runs the science  communication and outreach initiatives: taste of science – a science festival for adults, and a podcast called 2Scientists. She also enjoys running on trails and glasses of red wine, but not usually at the same time.

Monica Dunford is an experimental high-energy particle  physicist working on the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at  CERN. She is currently at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. Prof.  Dunford’s research ranges from combing through petabytes of data in  search of new elusive particles to crawling in small, dusty places  connecting thousands of kilometers of cables.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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p-Hacking Business – Ron Berman

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: p-Hacking Business – Ron Berman
Episode pub date: 2019-02-19


Whether intentionally or unintentionally, could the manipulation of statistics in marketing research be costing companies millions? In episode 43, Ron Berman from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business discusses in his research article “p-Hacking and False Discovery in A/B Testing,” co-authored with Leonid Pekelis, Aisling Scott, and Christophe Van den Bulte, and published July 18, 2018 on SSRN.

Websites

Ron’s personal website
Optimizely
“Improving experimentation efficiency at Netflix with meta analysis and optimal stopping”

News and Media
[email protected] (podcast) | Medium | CustomerThink | BoingBoing
Bonus Clips
Patrons of Parsing Science gain exclusive access to bonus clips from all our episodes and can also download mp3s of every individual episode.
Support us for as little as $1 per month at Patreon. Cancel anytime.

 

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Hosts / Producers
Doug Leigh & Ryan Watkins
How to Cite
Leigh, D., Watkins, R., & Berman, R.. (2019, February 20). Parsing Science – p-Hacking Business. figshare. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7749683
Music
What’s The Angle? by Shane Ivers
Transcript
Coming soon!
Photo credit
Wharton School

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.