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Courage: Stories about standing up for yourself

Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Courage: Stories about standing up for yourself
Episode pub date: 2019-01-25


This week, we’re presenting stories about the courage to be the person you were meant to be.

Part 1: The lessons that Margaret Rubega learns from her dad about fighting back are put to the test when he becomes the one she must stand up to.

Part 2: In following her dream of studying chemistry, Charlotte Istance-Tamblin sees how to break the toxic patterns in her relationships.

Margaret Rubega is a professor in the Department of  Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut. She  has spent her career studying a diverse array of birds, with a  consistent interest in answering the questions: How Does That Work? and  How Does it Matter? She started her career getting crapped on in a tern  colony, then studied a bird that’s famous for going in circles. Those  formative experiences probably explain a lot about her subsequent  career. She’s always been especially interested in feeding in birds —  the way they’re built, the mechanics, the food — because a bird that  isn’t fed is a bird that’s dead. As the Connecticut State Ornithologist,  she’s had to counsel a lot of homeowners about whether woodpeckers are  eating their houses (they aren’t), and talk to a lot of journalists.  Hoping to get better at it, via the log-in-your-own-eye method, she has  taught science communication and writing classes along with biology  classes for the last 10 years. She  currently leads an National Science  Foundation-funded research group studying methods of training graduate  science students to talk and write for non-scientists. You can find her  on Twitter @profrubega chatting about birds with students and others in  her #birdclass. 

Charlotte Istance-Tamblin, Charley to her friends, is a  2nd year undergrad student at The University of Manchester working  towards an MChem. She hopes to develop a deeper understanding of  radiochemistry before moving into teaching at the academic level.  Outside of university she enjoys roller derby and travelling with her  wife where ever they are able to.  

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Cognitive Biases on the Supreme Court – Jonathan Feingold & Evelyn Carter

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: Cognitive Biases on the Supreme Court – Jonathan Feingold & Evelyn Carter
Episode pub date: 2019-01-10


Can common cognitive biases and heuristics influence U.S. Supreme Court decisions? In episode 40, Jonathan Feingold and Evelyn Carter from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) discuss the sometimes selective use of social science research by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist as analyzed in their article “Eyes Wide Open: What Social Science Can Tell Us About the Supreme Court’s Use of Social Science” published on August 8, 2018 in the Northwestern University Law Review.

 
Websites and other resources

Evelyn’s Twitter profile
Jon’s publications
UCLA’s BruinX (Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion)
Overview of the McCleskey v. Kemp case
Overview of the Grutter v. Bollinger case

Bonus Clips
Patrons of Parsing Science gain exclusive access to bonus clips from all our episodes and can also download mp3s of every individual episode.
Support us for as little as $1 per month at Patreon. Cancel anytime.

 

Patrons can access bonus content here.

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Hosts / Producers
Ryan Watkins & Doug Leigh
How to Cite

Coming soon!

Music
What’s The Angle? by Shane Ivers
Transcript
Coming soon!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Episode 6 – Open Science

Podcast: ReproducibiliTea Podcast
Episode: Episode 6 – Open Science
Episode pub date: 2018-08-21


This week we talked about “Open Science: What, Why, and How” from Spellman, Gilbert, and Corker. You can find the paper on OSF https://osf.io/gv6r4/

0:14 Sophia is leaving Oxford 🙁 (But the Podcast will continue)
0:48 This week’s focus: Open Science What Why and How; few in the JC read it but the discussion was awesome https://osf.io/gv6r4/
2:15 Shoutout to Matt Jaquiery @MJaquiery
2:40 Broad Meaning of Open Science — what do we mean; potentially misleading to include things beyond Open?
5:10 The Centre for Science that’s Actually Science
6:05 Focussing on Open Data as “open signalling”
7:30 What even is Open Data? Criteria for Open Data; How it can go wrong
10:25 Open vs Usable Data
11:10 FAIR Guidelines — Findable Accessible Open Source Interoperable Reusable
12:20 (Advantages of) Open Code
15:30 Why is Open Science just Science Done Right?
16:00 Answer Sam: Open Code — Show Your Working
17:00 Answer Amy: Work cumulatively in order to avoid waste of taxpayers’ money
18:20 Answer Sophia: being open about subjectivities; slightly tautological argument of Open Science just is Science
21:10 Better system for citing code!
23:20 Not sharing data? Is it selfish?
27:30 BREAK
29:00 Shoutout to Remi Gau; Amy will be singing for you
29:40 Amy and Sophia compete for supremacy in the Table 2 challenge – what are the problems and solutions at each stage of the research process?
31:10 Challenging Two Psychologists Four Beers to the Crossover Event 5 Psychologists 50 Shots
32:00 Competition Begins: 1. Research Planning
34:35 AMY IS THE QUEEN
35:00 Competition part 2. Data Collection and Methods Reporting
36:30 Sam has a picture of James Heathers next to his bed (aka. Amy and Sophia try to make Sam look like a creep)
37:45 Competition part 3. Data Analysis and Reporting
38:54 https://jasp-stats.org
39:25 Competition part 4. Publication Process
41:30 Open Peer Review — Do you have any good or bad experiences of this?
42:40 Competition part 5. Storing and Archiving
44:10 Why do we give publishers the chance to adapt to openness, when we should just get rid of them?
49:55 Amy wins 14-10, but is also the kindest
The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ReproducibiliTea Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Rachel Mills exploring the sea floor

Podcast: The Life Scientific
Episode: Rachel Mills exploring the sea floor
Episode pub date: 2018-06-19


Professor Rachel Mills is a marine geochemist who studies the sea floor and hydrothermal vents, where water erupts from the earth’s crust at 360 degrees. The thick plumes emit many metals such as copper, gold, iron and rare earth minerals that are deposited on the sea bed. Rachel’s career has taken her all over the world and 4km deep under the ocean in small submersibles. These journeys are exciting and terrifying as samples are taken to understand how the metals travel many thousands of miles. The metals are involved in creating nutrients that supply the ocean’s food chain and control carbon uptake. There is also a lot of interest in mining the valuable deposits but can this be done without upsetting the ocean’s eco-system?

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from BBC Radio 4, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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From Sci-Fi to Reality, Quantum Technology with David Awschalom (Ep. 11)

Podcast: Big Brains
Episode: From Sci-Fi to Reality, Quantum Technology with David Awschalom (Ep. 11)
Episode pub date: 2018-10-15

David Awschalom is one of the world’s leading scientists studying the growing field of quantum engineering, turning what was once in the realm of science fiction into reality—which could offer revolutionary breakthroughs in communications, digital encryption, sensor technology and even medicine.

Studying the smallest elements in the universe is challenging on a number of levels, since quantum particles defy the laws of traditional physics.

“The behavior of these tiny pieces is unlike anything we see in our world,” Awschalom said. “If I pull a wagon, you know how it’s going to move. But at the atomic world, things don’t work that way. Wagons can go through walls; wagons can be entangled and share information that is hard to separate.”

On this episode of Big Brains, Awschalom shares how these unusual rules are leading to new technologies, why government and business are so interested in these breakthroughs, and how he’s helping to train a new generation of quantum engineers.

Subscribe to Big Brains on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, and rate and review the podcast.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from UChicago Podcast Network, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 7: Risk and reward in research

Podcast: How to Science
Episode: Episode 7: Risk and reward in research
Episode pub date: 2018-10-22

Astronomer Jon Miller’s research satellite in orbit broke because of a glitch in its software code. Miller talks about how he balances risk and reward in a science career.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from University of Michigan College of LSA, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Personality and Music Preference

Podcast: Instru(mental)
Episode: Personality and Music Preference
Episode pub date: 2018-07-06

Do our musical tastes reflect our personalities? This episode dives into research about how the Big Five personality factors might influence what music we like. Along the way, learn what you may able to know about a person after hearing their favorite music and how to use that knowledge to build more genuine connections with strangers and people you’ve known your whole life.

For more information on the research articles and music in this episode, go to www.InstrumentalPodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter (@instrumentalpod) for news and updates!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Brea Murakami, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Teaching Big Qual: benefits and challenges for students and teachers – Ros Edwards and Sarah Lewthwaite

Podcast: Methods
Episode: Teaching Big Qual: benefits and challenges for students and teachers – Ros Edwards and Sarah Lewthwaite
Episode pub date: 2018-12-20


In a special mini-series of our podcast, we discuss the secondary analysis of large-scale qualitative data as a new research method. Here Ros Edwards and Sarah Lewthwaite from the University of Southampton talk about how the method might benefit and challenge teachers and students of research methods.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from National Centre for Research Methods, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.